Friday, October 23, 2020

Federal Legislative and Administrative Rules Update


If you received a stimulus check last spring to help cope with the financial effects of the COVID-19 virus on your household, there’s something you should know. Those funds are technically an advance rebate of a special 2020 tax credit. Many taxpayers will be able to reconcile that rebate on their 2020 return to equal the tax credit allowed. However, there will be some for whom credits exceed their rebates and they can claim the balance as a refund, and others for whom their rebate exceeds their credits — although tax professionals do not believe those payments will have to be repaid.1

By a variety of measures, 2020 has been a tough year for many Americans. That is why it’s important to take a step back and consider what legislative changes and new administrative rules have been implemented to make this year a little easier. As you navigate this new landscape, please give us a call if you would like guidance in your investment decisions and future retirement income strategy.

According to a Care.com survey of parents with children younger than age 15, nearly three-quarters report that they intend to make major changes in their careers to accommodate the potential need for childcare this year. 2 Among them, 15% indicate they may leave the workforce altogether. As you plan, be aware that you may be eligible for paid leave to care for your children through a provision included in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

Passed in March, this provision grants up two weeks (80 hours) of emergency paid sick leave at two-thirds pay (capped at $200 per day) for parents unable to work because of a need to care for a child under the age of 18 if their school or care provider is closed or unavailable due to the pandemic. If schools open with an intermittent schedule, parents may be able to take paid leave only on the days their children are at home.3

In light of the amount of people who need to need to stay home because they are either sick, quarantined for possible exposure to COVID-19 or at high risk if they do contract the virus, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has relaxed rules regarding in-home care and medical services. Specifically, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and physician assistants can now provide home health services for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries — previously unavailable unless certified by a physician. They can now order, establish and review a plan of care and certify eligibility for home health services.4

If you’re a business owner and planning for your own care needs in retirement, be aware that Sub-Chapter C Corporations can deduct long-term care (LTC) insurance premiums on behalf of employees, business owner spouses or dependents. Self-employed workers also may deduct 100% of LTC premiums up to certain age-based limits.5 Unfortunately, individual tax filers may deduct LTC premiums only if they itemize tax deductions and only to the extent those premiums exceed 7.5% of their adjusted gross income.6 Note that some states allow for limited deductions on state tax returns.7

Given the national controversy on immigration rules, one lesser-known change made this year is that the federal government has actually loosened restrictions for certain visas. Effective May 14, 2020 through May 15, 2023, the Department of Homeland Security has removed certain limitations for employers to hire H-2B workers already residing in the U.S. to provide temporary labor or services essential to the food-supply chain. This was in response to disruptions caused by the COVD-19 pandemic.8

As for rule changes that affect the country’s financial health, the Federal Reserve announced in March that large banks have held up well in light of the strain caused by the recent economic decline. Moving forward, the central bank has mandated that large banks suspend share repurchases, cap dividend payments and limit dividends in an effort to help preserve capital during the third quarter of 2020.9

With a strong financial plan in place, we can help you prepare to leave the workforce and live comfortably. Take control of your financial future and give us a call at (734) 769-1719 today!

 

1 Joy Taylor and Rocky Mengle. Kiplinger. June 22, 2020. “Tax Changes and Key Amounts for the 2020 Tax Year.” https://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/taxes/t055-s011-tax-changes-and-key-tax-amounts-for-2020/index.html. Sept. 8, 2020.

2 Jennifer Liu. CNBC. Aug. 17, 2020. “Parents may qualify for paid leave, unemployment if schools are closed for the fall.” https://www.cnbc.com/2020/08/17/parents-may-qualify-for-paid-leave-unemployment-due-to-school-closure.html. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

3 Ibid.

Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services. April 30, 2020. “Trump Administration Issues Second Round of Sweeping Changes to Support U.S. Healthcare System During COVID-19 Pandemic.” https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/press-releases/trump-administration-issues-second-round-sweeping-changes-support-us-healthcare-system-during-covid. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

5 LTC Partner. 2020. “2020 Long Term Care Insurance Tax Deduction.” https://www.longtermcareinsurancepartner.com/long-term-care-insurance/2020-long-term-care-insurance-tax-deduction. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

6 Internal Revenue Service. Sept. 20, 2020. “Topic No. 502 Medical and Dental Expenses.” https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc502. Accessed Sept. 21, 2020.

7 LTC Partner. 2020. “2020 Long Term Care Insurance Tax Deduction.” https://www.longtermcareinsurancepartner.com/long-term-care-insurance/2020-long-term-care-insurance-tax-deduction. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

8 Federal Register. May 14, 2020. “Temporary Changes to Requirements Affecting H-2B Nonimmigrants Due to the COVID-19 National Emergency.” https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2020/05/14/2020-10486/temporary-changes-to-requirements-affecting-h-2b-nonimmigrants-due-to-the-covid-19-national. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

9 Federal Reserve. June 25, 2020. “Federal Reserve Board releases results of stress tests for 2020 and additional sensitivity analyses conducted in light of the coronavirus event.” https://www.federalreserve.gov/newsevents/pressreleases/bcreg20200625c.htm. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

Our firm is not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. government or any governmental agency and does not provide tax or legal advice.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial or investment advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 Investment Advisory Services are offered by Imber Financial Group, LLC., a Registered Investment Adviser firm. Insurance services are offered through Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. Imber Financial Group, LLC. and Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. are affiliated companies



Monday, October 19, 2020

Will You Be Able to Afford In-Home, Long-Term Care?


 

More than 90% of America’s older adults prefer to “age in place” in their own homes rather than in a senior housing community or facility.1 With today’s insight into how a deadly pandemic can affect nursing homes — as of September 6, COVID-19 has claimed nearly 55,000 nursing home residents’ lives — this preference may be prudent from a health care standpoint.2

However, aging at home also can be quite expensive. Much depends on the level and amount of care you require. And, as you can imagine, those levels are likely to increase as you get older. For some, it starts out as light housekeeping and running errands. That may progress into cooking meals and taking you to doctor appointments. Eventually, you may need someone to help you dress, groom and move around. A few hours a week could eventually change into 24-hour care, depending on your rate of health and/or mental decline.

According to the 2019 Genworth Cost of Care Survey, the average cost of an in-home caregiver is $22.50 per hour.3 If you need someone for eight hours a day, that could run you about $5,400 a month. If you need 24-hour care because, for example, you need help walking to the bathroom in the middle of the night, that cost could quickly amount to $16,200 a month. Is that a potential cost you’ve factored into your retirement income plan?

For many, the answer is no. We tend to plan as well as possible and hope for the best. If you’d like to explore different insurance options to help pay for potential long-term care needs, we can help. Contact us for more information.

As you develop a plan for old age and staying at home, it’s important to embrace technology. Today, about 75% of people age 55- to 65-years old own smartphones, download and use apps, and many search online for health information.4 This is a good start.

One of the silver linings of the pandemic is that more people have begun to embrace remote patient monitoring devices. Wearable technology enables certain vital signs to be constantly monitored and even emitted electronically to their physician’s office if they exceed normal levels. This allows some people who suffer from chronic illnesses or who are home-bound to monitor their own health instead of visiting doctors’ offices or requiring hospitalization.5

Another way to help combat the cost of 24-hour in-home care is to explore the growing availability of artificial intelligence-aided robots. While lacking the warmth of a human being, robots can research information, engage in conversation, play games and even make remote phone calls if their ward needs emergency care.6

If you’d rather have an actual body in the house to keep you company and provide for your needs, another way to help cut costs is to provide a rent-free room in exchange for care. This can start out as a simple arrangement in exchange for light housekeeping, cooking and chores. Later on, you may want to seek out a nursing student or other type of medical provider who can offer more substantive caregiving duties in exchange for a place to live.

With a strong financial plan in place, we can help you prepare to leave the workforce and live comfortably. Take control of your financial future and give us a call at (734) 769-1719 today!


1 Tracy Arabian. Gloucester Daily Times. Sep. 2, 2020. “Help available for all wanting to age in place.” https://www.gloucestertimes.com/news/living/senior-lookout-help-available-for-all-wanting-to-age-in-place/article_a375bb79-166d-5ddb-954f-8b70c11735ff.html. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

2 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Sept. 6, 2020. https://data.cms.gov/stories/s/bkwz-xpvg. Accessed Sept. 21, 2020.

3 Rachel Hartman. US News & World Report. June 10, 2020. “Can You Afford In-Home Elderly Care?” https://money.usnews.com/money/retirement/aging/articles/can-you-afford-in-home-elderly-care. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

4 Mallory Hackett. MobiHealthNews. Sept. 9, 2020. “An untapped market for digital health innovation exists among seniors hoping to age in place.” https://www.mobihealthnews.com/news/untapped-market-digital-health-innovation-exists-among-seniors-hoping-age-place. Accessed Sept. 9, 2020.

5 Rich Griset. Chesterfield Observer. Sept. 2, 2020. “During the pandemic, local companies help seniors bridge the technology gap.” https://www.chesterfieldobserver.com/articles/during-the-pandemic-local-companies-help-seniors-bridge-the-technology-gap/. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

6 Wolf Shlagman. HomeCare. Sept. 1, 2020. “The Potential of AI in Homecare.” https://www.homecaremag.com/september-2020/potential-ai-homecare. Accessed Sept. 8, 2020.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 Investment Advisory Services are offered by Imber Financial Group, LLC., a Registered Investment Adviser firm. Insurance services are offered through Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. Imber Financial Group, LLC. and Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. are affiliated companies



Thursday, October 15, 2020

Americans and Their 401(k)s


 

A recent survey found that working households experiencing financial strain due to the pandemic have not been inclined to make withdrawals from their 401(k)s to help make ends meet. In fact, the vast majority haven’t even changed their rate of contributions. Instead, these households are relying on the “old standbys” of surviving during economic decline: Reduced spending, using savings or an emergency fund, and maxing out credit cards.1

A reduction in spending shouldn’t be that difficult in the wake of today’s pandemic. After all, many people have cancelled vacations, no longer commute to work, and don’t spend nearly as much money going out to eat or for other entertainment activities. Some folks are even keeping their college students out of school for a semester or two, or at least taking the online route and saving on room and board. For those who remain employed, it’s actually a good time to increase savings.2

The coronavirus pandemic offers an ideal scenario to demonstrate the importance of diversifying retirement savings accounts. While some workers may defer as much salary as they can into a 401(k) to help reduce their current income taxes, others may spread those contributions over a work retirement plan and an IRA. There are a couple of strong reasons to consider including a Roth IRA in the mix. While Roth contributions do not offer a current tax deduction, remember that there are no tax consequences when you withdraw the money. Those funds have the opportunity to grow tax-free, and you’re free to tap your contributions without penalty when needed to supplement household income. However, keep in mind that you should consult with a qualified professional before taking any withdrawals from your retirement assets.

It’s also strategically key right now as income taxes are historically low. The income taxes you currently pay on Roth contributions now could be less than what you’ll have to pay on 401(k) distributions in the future. If you’d like to discuss ways to help maximize your retirement savings — including financial vehicles that allow for tax diversification and emergency funds for situations like pandemics — give us a call. We can tailor recommendations for your situation.

The Employee Benefits Security Administration (EBSA), which is an agency under the U.S. Department of Labor, recently announced an interim final rule for employers offering retirement plan benefits. The agency will require 401(k) and other types of retirement plan sponsors to provide employees with annual lifetime income illustrations. This is a customized statement designed to show each plan participant how his current account assets would likely translate into monthly income at a projected retirement age.3 This is similar to the Social Security Statement which projects future payouts for beneficiaries, updated annually.

The Labor Department also proposed a new rule this summer that is designed to incentivize more investment in fossil-fuel companies. Specifically, the rule would require pension and 401(k) plan wealth managers to always place economic interests ahead of “non-pecuniary goals” when it comes to Environmental, Social, and Corporate Governance (ESG) investing. Some money managers are investing more in renewable energy companies out of concern for the environment and for the long-term investment opportunities presented by sustainable power sources. While this new rule reflects the current administration’s position on fossil fuels, many money managers are concerned that the rule ignores evidence that ESG investing offers strong potential for favorable returns.4

One final note on Americans and their 401(k)s: Pay careful attention to how these plans are utilized in divorce settlements. Normally, dividing such a plan requires a court order separate from the divorce decree, called a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO). Also bear in mind that some plan administrators will not officially divide 401(k) assets until the plan participant retires.5

Another way to negotiate 401(k) assets in a divorce settlement is to allow one ex-spouse to retain the 401(k) plan while the other receives an asset of equal value (be sure to compare tax consequences and take those into account when determining equal value). Another option is to roll a portion of the 401(k) into a traditional IRA, which would avoid current penalties and tax liability and permit the ex-spouse to choose her own investments. However, this option is only available to those who have left their employer or are over age 59½.6 Not matter what route you choose, be sure to work with an experienced financial advisor, tax advisor and attorney to understand the full ramifications of splitting up a 401(k) account.

With a strong financial plan in place, we can help you prepare to leave the workforce and live comfortably. Take control of your financial future and give us a call at (734) 769-1719 today!



1 Mike Scarcella. BenefitsPRO. Aug. 20, 2020. “New virus-era survey shows tapping 401(k)s is ‘last resort’ for most participants.” https://www.benefitspro.com/2020/08/20/new-virus-era-survey-shows-tapping-401ks-is-last-resort-for-most-participants/. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

2 Fox Business. Sept. 1, 2020. “3 important 401(k) strategies to employ for the remainder of 2020.” https://www.foxbusiness.com/lifestyle/3-important-401k-strategies-to-employ-for-the-remainder-of-2020. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

3 Allison Bell. BenefitsPRO. Aug. 20, 2020. “5 things to know about the new 401(k) plan illustration regs.” https://www.benefitspro.com/2020/08/20/5-things-to-know-about-the-new-401k-plan-illustration-regs-for-agents-412-102799/. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

4 Tim Quinson. Bloomberg. Aug. 31, 2020. “Trump Plan to Block Green 401(k)s Stirs Fund Industry Fury.” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-08-31/trump-plan-to-limit-esg-investing-by-401-k-s-opposed-by-funds. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

5 Steven Wittenberg. Kiplinger. Sept. 1, 2020. “Tricky Divorce Issue: How to Divide 401(k)s, IRAs and Annuities.” https://www.kiplinger.com/personal-finance/601321/tricky-divorce-issue-how-to-divide-401ks-iras-and-annuities.  Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

6 Ibid.

Neither our firm nor its agents or representatives may give tax or legal advice. Be sure to speak with a qualified professional about your unique situation.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial or investment advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Investment Advisory Services are offered by Imber Financial Group, LLC., a Registered Investment Adviser firm. Insurance services are offered through Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. Imber Financial Group, LLC. and Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. are affiliated companies



Sunday, October 11, 2020

Financial Advising During a Pandemic

 

The pandemic has been hard on nearly everyone, and it’s particularly difficult for professionals who normally meet with clients in an office setting. Fortunately, financial advisors have been able to adapt to this “new normal.”

Our goal is to be our clients’ trusted advisors. Once that relationship is established, we can work with clients by phone, email, and even via a Zoom or Facetime call if they prefer. But make no mistake — we’re still here. We understand what it’s like to go through difficult times and a big part of our job is to help you weather challenges just like the one the country is facing now.

One way we do that is by keeping you informed on topical news, from the government’s stimulus package to key factors driving the market. While our job is to build you a financial plan designed to withstand a variety of economic conditions, it’s also important to stay flexible. If you could use advice regarding appropriate financial products for your situation, feel free to contact us. We are always here for you.

Since most financial advisors have long embraced technology to help engage with clients, this has been a true advantage during this time. In fact, the head of one wealth management firm recently observed that client-satisfaction levels have increased during the pandemic because of the many ways that advisors are staying in touch with clients, including phone calls, emails, texts and social media. In many cases, the immediacy and frequency of these interactions have helped facilitate a more substantive and ongoing dialogue between advisor and client.1

As financial advisors, it’s important for us to monitor not just investment performance, but the long-term outlook of U.S. businesses. According to a recent PwC COVID-19 US CFO Pulse Survey, today’s top concerns among the nation’s finance leaders include:2

  • The financial impact on their business, including effects on operations, liquidity and capital resources
  • The potential for a global recession
  • A reduction in workforce productivity
  • A decrease in consumer confidence and reduced consumption
  • Supply chain disruptions

By tracking these trends, we can help clients stay on track toward their goals and make course corrections when necessary. Ideally, your investment portfolio is designed to meet long-term goals, so temporary economic or market fluctuations should not precipitate drastic moves. One of our biggest challenges is reassuring clients and discouraging them from making decisions about their money based on panic and fear.

A financial advisor helps you establish a plan that incorporates a whole host of considerations, such as:

  • Focusing on your specific goals, such as asset allocation, college funding or retirement income
  • Taking a broader look at your entire financial picture, not just your investments
  • Taking into account the potential for various types of disruption, whether economic or personal
  • Helping you navigate challenges to continue moving toward financial goals despite any future challenges

Remember, our reliance on technology and digital tools is designed to help you stay connected to your accounts with 24/7 access from any device. They also enable us to stay in touch virtually in a private and safe environment. 

With a strong financial plan in place, we can help you prepare to leave the workforce and live comfortably. Take control of your financial future and give us a call at (734) 769-1719 today!

  

1 Jason Bisnoff. Forbes. May 21, 2020. “Merrill Lynch Head Predicts Bull Market For Financial Advice After Covid-19 Stock Selloff.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonbisnoff/2020/05/21/merrill-lynch-head-predicts-bull-market-for-financial-advice-after-covid-19-stock-selloff/#4118bdb39f75. Accessed Aug. 19, 2020.

2 PwC. April 22, 2020. “How COVID-19 is affecting the asset and wealth management industry.” https://www.pwc.com/us/en/library/covid-19/coronavirus-asset-and-wealth-management.html. Accessed Aug. 19, 2020.

Craig Hawley. June 4, 2020. “Don’t Go it Alone: 4 Benefits of Having a Financial Adviser.” https://www.kiplinger.com/article/retirement/t023-c032-s014-4-benefits-of-having-a-financial-adviser.html. Accessed Sept. 3, 2020.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance and investment products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic financial planning strategies and should not be construed as financial or investment advice. All investments are subject to risk including the potential loss of principal. No investment strategy can guarantee a profit or protect against loss in periods of declining values.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

Investment Advisory Services are offered by Imber Financial Group, LLC., a Registered Investment Adviser firm. Insurance services are offered through Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. Imber Financial Group, LLC. and Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. are affiliated companies



Tuesday, October 6, 2020

Potential Changes in Health Care

 


Health care innovations that were slow to take root have suddenly taken off during this pandemic. Working from home used to be a luxury enjoyed by relatively few workers. Now it is seriously being considered as a workable, cost-saving, long-term solution for many companies. The same goes for what they call “digital health.” Things like virtual office visits were not exactly the norm pre-COVID. That’s all changed, and potentially for the better.

Health care industry experts say the exposure digital health has received in recent months has helped practitioners truly understand and embrace its value. Moving forward, advocates see this as a way to create customized, patient-centric and value-based care plans by maximizing technology and ensuring a patient’s entire medical team is on the same page. Some predict that telehealth will become the norm for initial point-of-care visits for many non-emergency ailments, and in some cases enable providers to decide if a situation calls for urgent or emergency care. Telehealth could even lead to increased provider calls, considering how long people often wait to see a doctor because they don’t feel well enough to leave home.1

In other words, greater willingness to use — and incentivize — telehealth can help people get diagnosed and treated earlier, which can help prevent conditions from worsening before a patient sees a doctor. While digital technology alone may not reduce the cost of providing health care, it is a good first step to improving the health of millions of Americans.2 This can be particularly beneficial for the elderly, who for mobility reasons or cognitive decline may not seek the help they need. As we prepare for retirement, consider how to position your insurance plans to help maximize what technology, telehealth and digital medical equipment have to offer. If you’d like guidance on ways to help pay for future medical care, we can share ideas on what’s available.

Digital health isn’t without its challenges, including privacy and fraud concerns, as well as how to reach patients without access to or knowledge of available technology. And while there are definitely times when a physician needs to conduct a hands-on examination, telehealth is starting to be viewed as today’s answer to yesteryear’s house call.3

The future of digital health may see more widespread use through remote patient monitoring (RPM), such as wearable devices like smartwatches. This type of technology can even be helpful in predicting future virus outbreaks through early-warning detection of individuals with symptoms, as well as contact tracing to prevent further exposure and spread.4 

The problem of universal health insurance coverage has been exacerbated by today’s pandemic. A recent study by the Kaufman Family Foundation found that as people lost jobs in the early days of the country’s lockdown, nearly 27 million also lost health insurance due to unemployment. The good news is that about 80% of those people are eligible for Medicare or subsidized insurance via the marketplace. However, even with this opportunity, research shows that not everyone understands that they can apply for coverage while out of a job, meaning there is still an education gap to be addressed. As for the rest of 2020, an Urban Institute report estimates that 48 million nonelderly people reside in a household in which someone will lose a job by the end of the year.5

In an effort to address universal coverage, the U.S. Labor Department recently proposed pooled employer plans to begin in January 2021. However, even if such a move does gain traction in the future, it will apply only to those who are employed and work for an employer that participates in a pooled plan.6

With a strong financial plan in place, we can help you prepare to leave the workforce and live comfortably. Take control of your financial future and give us a call at (734) 769-1719 today!

 

1 Mike Matteo. BenefitsPRO. Aug. 20, 2020. “Why health care should not ‘return to normal’ post COVID.” https://www.benefitspro.com/2020/08/20/why-health-care-should-not-return-to-normal-post-covid/. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

2 AHIP. July, 2020. “Telehealth Growth During COVID-19.” https://www.ahip.org/wp-content/uploads/Telehealth-Infographic-2020.pdf. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

3 Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar. Martinsville Bulletin. Aug. 31, 2020. “Fad or future? Telehealth expansion eyed beyond pandemic.” https://martinsvillebulletin.com/news/national/govt-and-politics/fad-or-future-telehealth-expansion-eyed-beyond-pandemic/article_791a579e-bc8c-55df-8a60-8d4e0568e012.html. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

4 Lucienne Marie Ide. Medical Electronics. Aug. 31, 2020. “Disrupting Healthcare Through Tech: The Next Wave of Health IT Innovation.” https://www.medicaleconomics.com/view/disrupting-healthcare-through-tech-the-next-wave-of-health-it-innovation. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

5 Greg Land. BenefitsPRO. Sept. 2, 2020. “COVID-19 and the uninsured rate: What’s the deal?” https://www.benefitspro.com/2020/09/02/covid-19-and-the-uninsured-rate-whats-the-deal/. Accessed Sept. 16, 2020.

6 Melanie Waddell. BenefitsPRO. Aug. 21, 2020. “DOL issues proposed rule on pooled employer plans.” https://www.benefitspro.com/2020/08/21/dol-issues-proposed-rule-on-pooled-employer-plans-412-102825/. Accessed Sept. 2, 2020.

We are an independent firm helping individuals create retirement strategies using a variety of insurance products to custom suit their needs and objectives. This material is intended to provide general information to help you understand basic retirement income strategies and should not be construed as financial advice.

The information contained in this material is believed to be reliable, but accuracy and completeness cannot be guaranteed; it is not intended to be used as the sole basis for financial decisions. If you are unable to access any of the news articles and sources through the links provided in this text, please contact us to request a copy of the desired reference.

 Investment Advisory Services are offered by Imber Financial Group, LLC., a Registered Investment Adviser firm. Insurance services are offered through Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. Imber Financial Group, LLC. and Imber Wealth Advisors, Inc. are affiliated companies